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AMD Proclaims EPYC Momentum with New Dell EMC PowerEdge Servers

Thursday Feb 8th 2018 by Sean Michael Kerner

New PowerEdge R6415, R7415, and R7425 servers announced, and none of them are using Intel silicon.

AMD announced on Feb. 7 that its EPYC datacenter processor is gaining momentum and is now playing prominently in a trio of new Dell EMC PowerEdge servers.

The PowerEdge R6415, R7415, and R7425 servers include AMD's EPYC 7000 series silicon, which boast up to 64 cores of compute and 4TB of memory capacity.

"AMD EPYC processors offer tremendous performance and reliability, along with innovative configuration, I/O, and security features that PowerEdge customers can enjoy in these new servers," Forrest Norrod, senior vice president and general manager, Datacenter and Embedded Solutions Business Group at AMD, stated. "The ground-breaking capabilities of EPYC in single-socket configurations allow Dell EMC to create single-socket servers that can handle the demands of most customers' workloads, while offering real Total Cost of Ownership advantages."

AMD first announced the EPYC processor lineup in June 2017 as part of a strategy to displace Intel's Xeon from its current position of datacenter dominance.

"With AMD's EPYC processor integrated into the new Dell EMC PowerEdge platforms, we can deliver the scalability and lower total cost of ownership needed to meet the demands of new emerging workloads," Ravi Pendekanti, senior vice president, product management and marketing, Server and Infrastructure Systems at Dell EMC, stated.

The PowerEdge R7425 is a two-socket 2U rack server that enables a pair of 32-core EPYC processors. The R6415 and R7415 are both single-socket rack server systems.

"AMD's single-socket platform is a great example of Dell PowerEdge servers moving the industry forward to solve real customer problems,"Pendekanti said. "Together, we're enabling customers to advance their datacenter transformation by adding capacity for higher IO and memory-intensive applications for highly configurable single- and dual-socket designs."

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at ServerWatch and InternetNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

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